Tony Sapp’s Club Black Magic – Las Vegas, Nevada

Close Cover

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Club Black Magic originally opened on the corner of Bond, now known as Tropicana Ave & Paradise Rds. (4817 Paradise Road to be exact) on August 18, 1954 and would remain until 1968, when Camille Castro, “a stylish and flamboyant European Lesbian,” would purchase the club and rename it Le Bistro.

For most of the 1950s, it became the most popular jazz club in Las Vegas.According to this great article about the history of the Black Magic:

When musicians got off work on the Strip they gathered at the Black Magic for all-night jam sessions. This night-stalker ambiance attracted show kids from the Strip, and people who lived on ranches in Paradise Valley rode their horses through the desert to the Black Magic and tied them to hitching posts out front.

Information other than that article isn’t easy to come by and I would essentially just be quoting that entire article, so instead of me doing that, I implore you check out the article linked above to read about the fascinating history this place that would be known as Club Black Magic, Le Bistro French and ultimately Le Cafe and its importance to the Gay History of Las Vegas.

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Merry-Go-Round Cafes

Cardboard America

The Los Angeles Times – July 15, 1930

In 1930 a chain of “revolutionary”cafes opened in the West. Gustav and Gertrude Kramm’s idea of an cafe that served food on a rotating conveyor belt would be a smash hit and fade away in a short time.

The Los Angeles Times – July 15, 1930

The very first Merry-Go-Round Cafe location opened on January 1, 1930 at 245 East First Street in Long Beach, California Revolving Table Cafés, Ltd. was the name of the parent company that owned the idea. The restaurant was the first to be opened but was never intended to be the only one. Franchising began almost immediately.

The Los Angeles Times – April 27, 1930

In April, 1930, as the franchise was hitting stride, the corporation started by the Kramms would open a revolving table manufacturing plant in South Gate. Seven cafes would open in a six month span and the revolving table was a smash hit.

The concept was a hit. The concept was intriguing and the food cheap, which was a hit during the early days of the Depression that ravaged 1930s.  Lunch would only cost 35 cents, and dinner with an entree, salad and sides would only run 50 cents.

By the end of 1930, the now thriving chain would sponsor the Ralph and May Weyer Show on Los Angeles radio station KREG. The couple were semi-well known vaudeville and radio entertainers. The attention would grow the brand even further.

Within a year, there would be several Merry-Go-Cafes located in the West. These are the locations I have found so far. I have a feeling there are more, so this list may be amended later:

  1. 245 E. 1st St. – Long Beach
  2. 122 American Ave. – Long Beach
  3. 538 S. Spring Street – Los Angeles
  4. 1304 S. Figueroa – Los Angeles
  5. 639 S. La Brea – Los Angeles
  6. 672 S. Vermont – Los Angeles
  7. 2nd and James Street – Seattle, Washington
  8. 171 O’Farrell Street – San Francisco
  9. Denver, Colorado
  10. 137 W. Ocean St. – Huntington Park
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Merry-Go-Round Cafe – San Francisco, California

In 1931, the revolving table concept was taken up a notch. The new idea involved conveyors on two levels. The top layer displayed sandwiches, salads, and desserts and the bottom was solely for taking dirt dishes back to the kitchen. The entire thing moved slowly and easily enough for people to grab there food and dispense of their dishes without any major effort.

Business thrived through the early 1930s. As the Depression began to take hold and the fad of automated cafeterias fizzled out, the franchises started to struggle. In some locations the prices for lunch a dinner dropped by a nickle each. It didn’t matter.

One by one the individual locations would close.The final location to close was the 137 W. Ocean Avenue location in Long Beach. New owners took over the fledgling restaurant in 1938. It appears that that location remained open at least until October of 1943.

Long Beach Independent – September 15, 1938

There was a Merry Go Round Cafe in San Bernadino that was open in the late 1940s and early 50s but I think it just had the same name.

Sambo’s 1975 Directory

Cardboard America, Uncategorized

Sambosphotos.com

Sambo’s. The casual dining chain with the controversial name opened on June 17, 1957 in Santa Barbara, California.Sam Battistone Jr. & Newell Bohnett (the restaurant name is a combination of the Sam and the Bo from Bohnett) established the restaurant with one goal in mind – cheap 10 cent coffee and a good breakfast. They succeeded.

sambos

The first restaurant a great success and more restaurants followed. In 1958 a second Sambo’s opened in Sacramento, California would see for more locations by the end of 1959. By the time 1963 ended there over 20 locations in the West. At the end of the 1960s there were more than 100 locations. By the time this booklet was printed there were 712 restaurants nationwide.

However, their name was/became controversial. The Story of Little Black Sambo is a 1899 children’s book by Helen Bannerman. The controversial story is about a dark-skinned South Indian. The boy in the story would be one of, if not the, symbol that eventually came to be THE “pickaninny” stereotype Sambo’s used a version of the boy from the book as their mascot.

Controversy was not there at first, but as the franchise expanded, the name became a problem. As Sambo’s as their murals depicting the boy reached cities that had seen civil unrest, the name and mascot were seen as racist stereotypes of a bygone era. Lawsuits were filed in multiple states, the NAACP got involved.

The Daily Beast writer Andrew Romano wrote a great article about the history of Sambo’s and this excerpt explains the demise of the chain:

Publicly, Sam Battistone Sr.’s son, Sam D. Battistone, refused to cave. As one Ohio judge put it, depriving Sambo’s of its famous name would strike “a mortal blow” against the company. But Battistone and his fellow executives were clearly concerned, launching “an educational process to convince consumers Sambo’s is anything but racist.” In the South, Sambo’s eventually decided to rechristen itself No Place Like Sam’s; the name Jolly Tiger started appearing on locations throughout the Northeast. At certain branches, historical photographs of the local community began to take the place of “Sambo’s tale” murals on the walls.
But it was too little, too late. The sad fact is, Battistone, Sr. and Bohnett weren’t racists; they were just businessmen who seized on a branding opportunity—then wound up on the wrong side of history.
Meanwhile, unrelated legal and financial challenges were already chipping away at the company’s foundation. In 1979, 600 managers walked out after Sambo’s restructured its managerial program. Battistone’s successor was charged with funneling company money into a cattle-ranching scheme. Health code violation fines followed. So did a jingle lawsuit from Dr Pepper and several additional suits from the SEC. The racial controversy undoubtedly hurt Sambo’s brand, especially in the Northeast. But it’s unlikely that a more innocuous name would have saved Sambo’s from financial ruin. By 1982, most of the restaurants had been sold and the corporation was forced to file for bankruptcy.

This directory is from 1975, one the last years of expansion for the chain. At one point there 1,117 locations nationwide. Maybe at some point if I find a later directory I will include every single one. For now, these are the locations as of the printing of this 1975 directory.

Green Font = Still Sambo’s
Blue Font = Building still standing
Red Font = Building gone

ALABAMA

BIRMINGHAM
316 Valley Ave. (torn down around 2012)
DOTHAN
825 W. Main St. (not sure if the address is wrong in the book but I can’t figure out where it was)
GADSDEN
2108 Rainbow Dr.
HUNTSVILLE
3790 University Dr.
MOBILE
2375 Airport Blvd
TUSCALOOSA
3610 McFarland Ave.

ARIZONA

CASA GRANDE
1202 E. Florence Blvd.
GLENDALE
4372 W. Olive St.
KINGMAN
2831 E. Andy Devine Ave.
MESA
6813 E. Apache Trail
NOGALES
2206 Tucson Highway (not sure where)
PHOENIX
2720 W. Camelback Rd.
101 E. McDowell Rd.
10436 N. 32nd St.
2927 E. Indian School Rd.
3416 W. Thomas Rd.
2302 Bell Road
PRESCOTT
1235 E. Gurley St.
SCOTTSDALE
4360 N. Scottsdale Rd.
SIERRA VISTA
2290 E. Fry Blvd.
TEMPE
1020 E. Apache Blvd.
TUCSON
902 E. Broadway
7280 W. Drachman
5460 E. Speedway Blvd.
WINSLOW
725 W. 3rd St.
YOUNGTOWN
11121 Grand Ave.
YUMA
2951 Fourth Ave.

ARKANSAS

FAYETTEVILLE
4143 North College Ave.
FORT SMITH
5111 Rogers Ave. (Maybe?)
LITTLE ROCK
2815 Cantrell Rd.
8107 Geyser Springs Rd.
NORTH LITTLE ROCK
4701 John F. Kennedy Blvd.

CALIFORNIA

ALAMEDA
1919 Webster St.
ANAHEIM
1100 W. Katella St.
2110 S. Harbor Blvd.
605 S. Brookhurst
ARROYO GRANDE
775 El Camino Real
ATASCADERO
6910 El Camino Real
AUBURN
13365 E. Lincoln Way
AZUSA
855 E. Alosta Ave.
BAKERSFIELD
3939 Ming Ave.
354 Oak St.
1736 Union Ave.
BANNING
3285 W. Ramsey St.
BARSTOW
1311 E. Main St.
BLYTHE
9266 Highway 60

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Blythe, California

BUELLTON
321 McMurray Rd.
BUENA PARK
8525 Beach Blvd.
CAMARILLO
1620 E. Daily Dr.
CAMPBELL
1461 W. Campbell Ave.
CANOGA PARK
22200 Sherman Way
CARMEL
Rio Rd. at Highway 1
CARMICHAEL
7201 Fairoaks Blvd.
CARPINTERIA
1114 Casistas Pass Rd.
CASTRO VALLEY
3360 Castro Valley Blvd.
CHICO
1910 Esplanade
CHINO
12193 Central Ave.
CHULA VISTA
303 Broadway
CITY OF COMMERCE
5850 South Eastern Ave.
CITY OF INDUSTRY
17200 E. Railroad St.
CLAREMONT
710 S. Indian Hill Rd.
CONCORD
1680 Willow Pass Rd.
CORONA
4714 Green River Dr.
CUPERTINO
10358 S. Saratoga-Sunnyvale
DAVIS
255 2nd St.
DOWNEY
7954 Imperial Highway
EL CAJON
1104 Fletcher Parkway
EL CENTRO
609 N. Imperial
EL MONTE
3431 North Peck Rd.
EUREKA
5th & Broadway
FAIRFIELD
2190 N. Texas St.
FOUNTAIN VALLEY
16205 Brookhurst St.
FRESNO
831 Van Ness Ave.
1574 Blackstone Ave.
460 E. Shaw Ave.
FULLERTON
3920 N. Harbor Blvd.
GARDEN GROVE
7942 Garden Grove Blvd.
GILROY
6120 Monterey St.
GOLETA
5934 Calle Real
GRANADA HILLS
17921 Chatsworth St.
HANFORD
330 S. 11th Ave.
HAYWARD
255 W. Jackson St.
HEMET
1380 E. Florida
INDIO
83254 Highway 99

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Indio, California

INGLEWOOD
1051 S. Prairie Ave.
LAFAYETTE
3586 Mt. Diablo Blvd.
LAKE TAHOE
3284 Lake Tahoe Blvd.
LIVERMORE
1304 First Street
LODI
700 Victor Road
LONG BEACH
1760 Bellflower Rd.
LOS ANGELES
1407 N. Mission Rd.
1777 E. Olympic Blvd.
2601 S. Soto St.
600 S. Vermont Ave.
LOS BANOS
855 W. Pacheco Blvd.
LOS GATOS
165 Saratoga Ave.
MERCED
200 Merced Mall
MISSION VIEJO
27511 Puerta Real
MODESTO
926 McHenry Ave.
1800 Prescott Ave.
MONTEREY
2031 Fremont St.
NAPA
303 Soscol
NEEDLES
710 Broadway
NEWARK
5745 Thornton Ave.
NORTH HOLLYWOOD
12520 Sherman Ave.
NORTHRIDGE
8726 Tampa Ave.
NORWALK
12623 Norwalk Blvd.
NOVATO
1700 Novato Blvd.
OAKLAND
Third & Broadway
OCEANSIDE
2009 Mission Ave.
ORANGE
2810 E. Chapman Ave.
OROVILLE
515 Montgomery St.
OXNARD
2420 Vineyard Ave.
PALMDALE
350 W. Palmdale Blvd.
PALM DESERT
73035 Highway 111
PALM SPRINGS
1596 N. Palm Canyon Dr.
411 E. Palm Canyon Dr.
PARAMOUNT
8411 E. Alondra Blvd.
RED BLUFF
200 S. Main St.
REDDING
1335 Market St.
2230 Pine St.
RICHMOND
12323 San Pablo Ave.
RIVERSIDE
4093 University St.
3650 Tyler Ave.
SACRAMENTO
3140 Arden Way
6601 Folsom Blvd.
605 16th St.
4661 Watt Ave.
1900 W. Capitol Ave.
SAN BERNADINO
770 West 5th St.
702 E. Highland Ave.
SAN BRUNO
2010 Rollingwood Dr.
SAN CLEMENTE
610 Camino De Las Mares
SAN DIEGO
10430 Friars Road
4610 Pacific Highway
4865 Harbor Dr.
7398 Clairemont Mesa Blvd.
SAN FRANCISCO
2353 Lombard St.
SAN JOSE
409 S. Second St.
1860 The Alameda
2122 McKee Rd.
2112 S. First St.
700 S. Winchester Blvd.
SAN LEANDRO
15501 Hesperian Blvd.
SANTA ANA
3001 S. Bristol
2101 E. 1st St.
SANTA BARBARA
216 W. Cabrillo Blvd.
3768 State St.
22 E. Montecito St.
SANTA CLARA
2910 El Camino Real
SANTA CRUZ
1107 Ocean St.
SANTA FE SPRINGS
13500 Firestone Blvd.
SANTA MARIA
1841 S. Broadway
SANTA MONICA
1560 Lincoln Blvd.
2021 Santa Monica Blvd.
1819 Ocean Ave.
SANTA ROSA
1350 Farmers Lane
SEPULVEDA
15651 Nordhoff
SIMI
2025 S. 1st St.
STOCKTON
11 N. Center St.
STUDIO CITY
12215 Ventura Blvd.
SUNNYVALE
800 Ahwanee
TARZANA
18461 Ventura Blvd.
TORRANCE
819 W. Carson St.
4127 Pacific Coast Highway
22924 Western Ave., South
TULARE
1161 East Tulare Ave.
UKIAH
1430 North State St.
VALLEJO
901 Redwood St.
VICTORVILLE
14678 Seventh St.
VISALIA
610 W. Main St.
VISTA
540 W. Broadway
WESTLAKE VILLAGE
3887 Thousand Oaks Blvd.
WHITTIER
16295 E. Whittier Blvd.
WOODLAND
14 W. Court St.
YREKA
145 Montague Rd.
YUBA CITY
590 Colusa Ave.

COLORADO

ARVADA
9543 Ralston Dr.
CANON CITY
1837 Fremont Dr.
COLORADO SPRINGS
609 S. Circle Dr.
4315 N. Academy Blvd.
DENVER
2910 E. Colfax Ave.
DURANGO
666 Camino del Rio
GRAND JUNCTION
701 Horizon Dr.
GREELEY
1415 8th Ave.
LITTLETON
399 W. Littleton Blvd.
PUEBLO
3510 N. Elizabeth St.
3400 W. Northern Ave.

FLORIDA

BOCA RATON
3249 N. Federal Hwy.
BRADENTON
613 44th Ave. W.
CLEARWATER
1535 Gulf-to-Bay Blvd.
3270 U.S. 19 North
CORAL GABLES
One Miracle Mile
FORT LAUDERDALE
1819 State Rd. #84
FORT PIERCE
2625 S. U.S. 1
FORT WALTON BEACH
543 N. Elgin Parkway
JACKSONVILLE
5601 Beach Blvd.
LAKELAND
1345 W. Memorial Blvd.
2410 S. Florida Ave.
LARGO
3501 E. Bay Dr.
LEESBURG
Perkins St.
MAITLAND
1221 S. Orlando Ave.
MARGATE
5750 NW 15th St.
MELBOURNE
75 E. NASA Blvd.
MIAMI
3595 Biscayne Blvd.
2690 W. Flagler St.
MIAMI BEACH
6900 Collins Ave.
2701 Collins Ave.
NAPLES
1925 Davis Blvd.
NEW PORT RICHEY
3315 U.S. 19 S.
OAKLAND PARK
911 E. Commercial Blvd.
ORLANDO
4849 S. Orange Blossom Trail
5623 West Colonial Dr.
PANAMA CITY
5000 W. Highway 98
PENSACOLA
5831 Pensacola Blvd.
POMPANO BEACH
2250 N. Federal Highway
SOUTH DAYTONA BEACH
2240 Ridgewood Ave.
ST. PETERSBURG
1101 34th St. N.
1550 66th St. North
TAMARAC
5299 N. State Rd. #7
TAMPA
215 S. Dale Mabry Highway
TITUSVILLE
2925 S. Washington Avenue
VENICE
State Road 45 & Sub-Station Road
WINTER HAVEN
875 Sixth St., NW

GEORGIA

ATLANTA
4115 NW Fulton Industrial Blvd.
COLUMBUS
3040 Victory Way
DORAVILLE
5800 Buford Hwy.
SAVANNAH
7805 Abercorn St. Extension
VALDOSTA
3151 Ashley St.
WARNER ROBINS
1700 Watson Blvd.

IDAHO

BOISE
2197 N. Garden St.
925 Vista Ave.
IDAHO FALLS
1438 W. Broadway
LEWISTON
1407 S. Main St.
POCATELLO
130 S. 5th Ave.

ILLINOIS

BLOOMINGTON
2302 E. Washington Blvd.
CHAMPAIGN
202 E. Green St
DE KALB
1221 W. Lincoln Hwy.
DOLTON
633 E. Sibley Blvd.
EFFINGHAM
Route 32 & 33
GALESBURG
1081 East Main St.
HANOVER PARK
1266 Irving Park Rd.
JACKSONVILLE
1604 W. Morton Ave.
JOLIET
411 Richards St.
LOVES PARK
411 Riverside Blvd.
MACOMB
1514 W. Jackson St.
NORMAL
1602 N. Main St.
PEKIN
3500 Court St.
ROCK ISLAND
3108 11th St.

INDIANA

ANDERSON
817 S. State Rd.
FORT WAYNE
3810 Coldwater Rd.
1535 Coliseum Blvd. N.
6631 New Haven Ave.
FRANKLIN
U.S. 31 & N. Shopping Center
INDIANAPOLIS
2701 N. Shadeland Ave.
KOKOMO
301 Espanol Dr.
LAFAYETTE
2413 Sagamore Parkway S.
LOGANSPORT
3800 U.S. Hwy. 24 East
MUNCIE
1025 Wheeling
PORTAGE
6121 Melton Rd.
WEST LAFAYETTE
1223 Sagamore Parkway

IOWA

AMES
415 Lincoln Way
BETTENDORF
Duck Creek Plaza
CEDAR FALLS
4117 University Ave.
CEDAR RAPIDS
3707 First Ave SE
DAVENPORT
6109 Brady St.
DES MOINES
2121 Hubbell Ave.
FORT DODGE
2422 5th Ave. S.
IOWA CITY
830 S. Riverside Dr.
MARSHALLTOWN
2500 S. Center St.
MUSCATINE
1903 Park Ave.
SIOUX CITY
4301 Stone Ave.
WEST DES MOINES
1530 22nd St.

KANSAS

EMPORIA
2002 W. Sixth Ave.
HAYS
3404 Vine St.
HUTCHINSON
200 E. Fourth St.
LAWRENCE
1511 W. 23rd St.
MANHATTAN
2710 Anderson Avenue
MISSION
6403 Johnson Dr.
OVERLAND PARK
8135 Santa Fe Dr.
SALINA
540 S. Broadway
SHAWNEE
Kansas Hwy. 10 & Nieman Rd.
TOPEKA
109 E. 29th St.
WICHITA
1421 N. West Street

KENTUCKY

ERLANGER
3060 Dixie Highway
OWENSBORO
3107 Frederica St.
PADUCAH
2150 Irvin Cobb Dr.

LOUISIANA

BATON ROUGE
2323 S. Acadian Thruway
BOSSIER CITY
104 Benton Road Spur
LAFAYETTE
707 Frontage Road
LAKE CHARLES
4001 Ryan Street
MONROE
3224 Louisville
SHREVEPORT
1107 W. 70th St.

MISSISSIPPI

HATTIESBURG
3301 Hardy St.
JACKSON
130 Angle Dr.
MERIDIAN
Highway 19 North

MISSOURI

JOPLIN
511 N. Range Line
KANSAS CITY
1109 E. Bannister Rd.
9400 Blue Ridge Cutoff
7100 Eastwood Traffic Way
3145 Gilham Plaza
LIBERTY
201 N. 291 Hwy.
NORTH KANSAS CITY
1041 Burlington
POPLAR BLUFF
U.S. 67 North
SEDALIA
2001 S. Limit Ave.
SIKESTON
Interstate 55 & U.S. 62
SPRINGFIELD
923 W. Sunshine St.
ST. CHARLES
3939 Highway 70
ST. JOSEPH
1509 N. Belt Hwy.
ST. LOUIS
10182 Natural Bridge
11814 Lusher Road

MONTANA

BILLINGS
2525 First Ave. South
6 24th St. West
BOZEMAN
319 N. 7th Ave.
GREAT FALLS
2001 10th Ave. South
225 Central Ave.
HELENA
1231 Prospect Ave.

NEBRASKA

FREMONT
1110 E. 23rd St.
GRAND ISLAND
1325 S. Locust St.
OMAHA
4925 L Street

NEVADA

LAS VEGAS
5140 Boulder Hwy.
601 Las Vegas Blvd. North
3737 Las Vegas Blvd. South
NORTH LAS VEGAS
2200 E. Lake Mead Blvd.
RENO
895 W. Fourth St.
1945 S. Virginia
SPARKS
2200 B Street

NEW MEXICO

ALBUQUERQUE
5210 E. Central Ave.
6800 Menaul Blvd. NE
2000 Menaul Blvd. NE
CARLSBAD
3720 National Park Hwy.
CLOVIS
1620 Mabry Dr.
FARMINGTON
400 W. Main St.
LAS CRUCES
930 El Paseo Dr.
ROSWELL
1208 North Main St.

NORTH CAROLINA

BURLINGTON
Huffman Mill Road & Kerney
GREENSBORO
833 Greenhaven Dr.
WILSON
1228 Torboro St.

NORTH DAKOTA

FARGO
2130 S. University Dr.
GRAND FORKS
1421 S. Washington St.

OHIO

BEDFORD HEIGHTS
19600 Rockside Rd.
CLEVELAND
16130 Brookpark Rd. SW.
DELHI PIKE
4990 Delhi Pike
WILLOWICK
31640 Vine St.

OKLAHOMA

BARTLESVILLE
919 Frank Phillips Blvd
DUNCAN
1317 N. Highway 81
MUSKOGEE
635 S. 32nd
OKLAHOMA CITY
3401 N. Classen Blvd.
4548 NW 23rd St.
3701 South Western Ave.
TULSA
4401 E. 31st St.

OREGON

BEAVERTON
8975 SW Beaverton/Hillsdale Hwy.
BEND
3081 NW Hwy. 97
COOS BAY
581 N. Bayshore Dr.
CORVALLIS
455 NW Harrison Blvd.
EUGENE
1675 Franklin Rd.
1488 W. Seventh Ave.
GRANTS PASS
144 SE Seventh St.
GRESHAM
1355 NE Division
HILLSBORO
422 SE 10th Ave.
KLAMATH FALLS
5140 S. 6th St.
LAKE OSWEGO
670 N. State St.
McMINNVILLE
1101 Highway 99 West
MEDFORD
1025 S. Riverside
MILWAUKIE
15350 SE McLoughlin Blvd.
NEWPORT
705 SW Coast Highway
PORTLAND
2275 W. Burnside St.
2651 E. Burnside St.
3330 SE 82nd Ave.
SALEM
1660 Lancaster Dr. NE
480 Liberty St. SE
TIGARD
11960 SW Pacific Hwy.

SOUTH CAROLINA

ANDERSON
3191 N. Main St.
GREENWOOD
421 Montague St.

SOUTH DAKOTA

RAPID CITY
719 Jackson Blvd.
SIOUX FALLS
1917 W. 41st St.

TENNESSEE

CHATTANOOGA
3907 Brainerd St.
JACKSON
2207 Bells Hwy.
MEMPHIS
1780 Winchester Rd.
NASHVILLE
2304 Brick Church Pike
RED BANK
4103 Dayton Blvd.

TEXAS

ABILENE
401 Westwood Dr.
AMARILLO
2028 Paramount Blvd.
ARLINGTON
2201 East Pioneer Parkway
AUSTIN
800 Anderson Square Blvd.
CLEAR LAKE CITY
1425 NASA Blvd.
COLLEGE STATION
1045 Texas Ave.
CORPUS CHRISTI
5015 Ayers St.
DALLAS
13015 Coit Rd.
1625 S. Buckner Blvd.
DENTON
706 Fort Worth Drive
EL PASO
1500 Airway Blvd.
2929 N. Mesa Ave.
FORT WORTH
4501 E. Lancaster
8124 Hwy. 80 West
GARLAND
730 W. Centerville Rd.
GREENVILLE
5203 Wesley Street
HOUSTON
1150 Edgebrook Rd.
2318 Farm Road 1960
4602 Dacoma St.
LONGVIEW
1023 E. Marshall
LUBBOCK
511 University Ave.
McALLEN
1629 N. 10th St.
MIDLAND
3201 Andrews Highway
ODESSA
1229 E. 8th St.
PARIS
1651 Clarksville St.
SAN ANGELO
3101 Sherwood
SAN ANTONIO
1546 N. Babcock Rd.
1105 Vance Jackson Blvd.
SHERMAN
2100 Hwy. 75 North
TEMPLE
I-35 & Adams St.
115 N. General Bruce Dr.
UNIVERSAL CITY
1533 Pat Booker Rd.
WACO
1201 Wooded Acres Dr.
WICHITA FALLS
3310 Kemp Blvd.

UTAH

LOGAN
690 N. Main St.
OGDEN
3670 Washington Blvd.
PROVO
365 West 1230 North
SALT LAKE CITY
215 West North Temple
2741 S. State St.
TAYLORSVILLE
1665 W. 4100 S. Redwood Rd.

WASHINGTON

ABERDEEN
720 W. Wishkah St.
AUBURN
2235 Auburn Way
BALLARD
6100 15th NW
BELLEVUE
825 116th Ave. NE
BREMERTON
3333 Kitsap Way
ELLENSBURG
101 W. 8th St.
EVERETT
10020 Evergreen Way
FEDERAL WAY
31448 Pacific Highway South
LACEY
608 SE Slater Kinney Rd.
LONGVIEW
848 11th Ave.
MT. VERNON
1501 Riverside Hwy.
PUYALLUP
105 9th Ave. SW
RENTON
610 Rainier Ave. South
RICHLAND
890 George Washington
SEATTLE
14325 First Ave. S.
8800 N. Aurora Ave.
6166 Fourth Ave. South
20305 Aurora Ave. North
2825 S. 188th St.
SPOKANE
West 128 Third Ave.
3525 N. Division
E. 11520 Sprague Ave.
TACOMA
7826 S. Tacoma Way
VANCOUVER
2200 E. Fourth Plain (I think it’s the same building)
WALLA WALLA
4 West Oak Street
WENATCHEE
1014 N. Wenatchee Ave.
YAKIMA
314 N. First St.
2208 S. 1st St.

WISCONSIN

APPLETON
3633 W. College Avenue
FOND DU LAC
718 W. Johnston Ave.
JANESVILLE
1313 Milton Ave.
MILWAUKEE
6727 W. Hampton Ave.
RACINE
5016 Washington Ave.
SCHOFIELD
280 Grand Ave.

WYOMING

CHEYENNE
2300 Carey Ave.

Snelgrove Ice Cream Co. – Salt Lake City, Utah

Cardboard America, Uncategorized

Originally located at  1055 East 21st South  and 2100 South, the first Snelgrove ice cream shop was established by Charles Snelgrove in (1887-1976) in 1929, later managed by his eldest son C. Laird Snelgrove. Snelgrove’s remained family owned until 1990.

The Salt Lake Tribune – November 27, 1935

Snelgrove’s Distinctive ice cream was founded

As Snelgrove’s started to gain a reputation, Charles Snelgrove had an idea that would prove to be a smart one.

In 1931, Snelgrove saw that the Paramount and Capitol Theatres in Salt Lake City had recently purchased refrigerators and he saw an opportunity. He donated gallons of ice cream to the theatres but not for them to sell. The ice cream was to be given to the patrons.

“See a good show and enjoy, complimentary, a dish of Snelgrove’s Distinctive Ice Cream, served from a General Electric Refrigerator,” read a newspaper ad from the summer of 1931. The idea worked and Snelgrove’s Distinctive Ice cream became a big hit.

 In 1935, Snelgrove’s sent ice cream to President Franklin Roosevelt’s Little White House in Warm Springs, Georgia for 375 guests at at Thanksgiving feast. The guests loved it.

During World War II, Snelgrove’s, like many other companies, sacrificed and had to adjust in order to stay in business. Snelgrove’s reduced their menu from 32 flavors to 15 due to difficulty obtaining enough milk and cream.

Snelgrove’s survived the War and successfully expanded their business.  In the 1930s there were three locations: 1055 East 21st South, 307 South 4th East and 222 East South Temple in Salt Lake City.However, by the end of the 1950s there was only one location remaining at 850 East 21st South.

It wasn’t until the 1960s that the business expanded and a manufacturing facility and a newly built ice cream parlor were built just a few blocks west, at 850 E. 2100 South.

The Salt Lake Tribune – August 22, 1961

Snelgrove’s at the 2100 South location was famous for its large, rotating, double-scoop, double cone sign.

The sign on 2100 South was built in 1962 by the Young Electric Sign Company (YESCO).

The sign was YESCO’s “first three-dimensional design. The giant cone  was built on a metal frame with wire mesh on it to give it its form and the entire thing was then covered in fiberglass. It was painted pink and brown to represent a strawberry and chocolate ice cream cone.

The cone worked almost too well. Snelgrove’s couldn’t keep up with the orderes for the strawberry and chocolate cones like the one on the sign.

Snelgrove’s was just an ice cream parlor, they also packaged and sold their ice cream at grocery stores around the region. They also made chocolates.

Snelgrove’s struggled to survive as cheaper ice cream came to dominate the market. In 1991, the Snelgrove’s sold the company to MKD Distributors and all of the stores were closed.

According to this article by Amy McDonald in the Salt Lake Tribune:

In 2008, Dreyer announced it would stop producing Snelgrove ice cream because of business realities, a company spokesperson told The Salt Lake Tribune.

Squirrel Brothers Ice Cream, at 605 E. 400 South, formerly a Snelgrove franchise, was the last shop to offer Snelgrove brand ice cream. The building is now occupied by a Jimmy John’s, but the double cone still spins atop the sandwich shop, albeit painted completely black.

In the coming weeks, the names Nestle and Dreyer will be added and, Dreyer factory manager Laura Adams said, the ice cream scoops’ original flavors — er, colors — will be restored. And what will become of the original Snelgrove neon lettering? Dreyer has promised to give it to the Sugar House Community Council, which plans to preserve it along with other historical signs in the area.

The sign is such a part of the Sugar House area of Salt Lake City that it was featured on a 2002 Winter Olympics pin.

2002 Olympic Coca-cola double Scoop Ice Cream Cone Sponsor Pin

Pantley’s Pagan Hut – Depoe Bay, Oregon

Cardboard America, Cardboard Motels, Uncategorized

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From the verso:

Luxuriously furnished apartments offer fireplaces and kitchens where a touch of the bell brings service from the cocktail bar or dining room. From large windows you will view the magnificence and splendor of the Pacific and its rugged Oregon coastline. Beautiful PAGAN HUT open daily year around. Heated, glass-enclosed swimming pool.

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Courtesy of Swell Map

The Eugene Guard – May 19, 1956

Pantley’s opened sometime in the 1950s. It  was originally known as King Surf Resort and the Tiki Room was known as the Pupule Lanai.

Robert Pantley purchased the property sometime before or around 1956. I am not totally sure it wasn’t called King Surf Resort for a while and the tiki restaurant was Pantley’s Pagan Hut before it was all changed.

Pantley’s Pagan Hut was known for its tiki decor and its nightly entertainment. Opcelita & Garcia, the “Latin American Hot Peppers” and Roberto & his native drums were but two of the acts that performed at Pantley’s.

There was another Pantley’s Pagan Hut in downtown Portland, Oregon at SW 10th and Stark.

 

Corvallis Gazette-Times – April 12, 1962

Robert Pantley was no longer president in 1962 when he plead guilty to a charge of failing to file excise taxes in 1956. Pantley, then 54 years old, was sentenced to one year in prison and fined $5,000.

The Pagan Hut lasted in to the early-mid 1960s. It then became known as known as the Surfpoint Inn. The Surfpoint seemed to run in to some trouble. In December, 1968, the tide came so far inland that it smashed the property windows and flooded the dining room.  In October, 1977, the property was seriously damaged by a series of storms that hit the Oregon Coast.

The article I found in the November 6, 1977 Salem, Oregon says that the damage was well over $30,000 and that it was the second time in a week that water had come in to the lounge. I can’t find any information after that.

 

BONUS: Pagan Hut drink menu courtesy of Critiki.

DOUBLE BONUS: Brochure courtesy of a Tiki Room forum post from 2009:

Chick’n G’lore – Albany, New York

Cardboard America, Uncategorized
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Altamont Enterprise – July 23, 1965

Chick’n G’lore opened at 230 Washington Ave. in Albany, New York in July 1965. Started by Joseph Gadomski, the small, glass-fronted restaurant featured a 10-foot tall chicken in the lobby. Chick’n G’lore offered shrimp, fish, ribs, chicken (of course), and had a business within the business called Pizza G’lore.

Both Chick’n and Pizza G’lore offered free delivery and low prices. One of the more popular options was Pizza G’lore’s permanent buy 4 pizzas get one free special.

The restaurant is gone now. I am not sure when it closed. I know it lasted until at least 1976 and then can’t find anything after that. I don’t know what happened to the rooster. I’d like to think it settled down and lives with his nice family out in the country.

Cook no more – Call Chick’n G’lore!

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Steve’s Gay 90’s – South Tacoma, Washington

Cardboard America

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Steve’s Gay 90’s restaurant was located at 5238-40 South Tacoma Way in South Tacoma, Washington. Originally known as Steve’s Cafe, the restaurant was opened by Steve Pease and John Stanley in 1941. After a few years of operation the name was changed to better fit its atmosphere and decor.

The restaurant offered cocktails and American food served smorgasbord style for a nominal charge, with dining music  and entertainment in the evening. The Gay Nineties had a smorgasbord table and booths decorated to appear like “surreys with fringe on top.” Checked table cloths and wagon wheel chandeliers complete the down home look.

In the mid-fifties, Steve’s added to their unique treasure trove an actual cable car, converted to street driving, bought at auction in San Francisco and driven to Tacoma.

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A postcard showing the newly acquired cable car

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Steve’s as it looked several years later.

The Cable Car Room then opened with replicas of Tacoma and San Francisco cable cars as booths in the cocktail lounge.

The crowning gem was the Opera House, opened in a mid fifties expansion, furnished with antiques from the South Tacoma mansions and featuring a twice nightly floor show with can can girls, among other performers.

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Sadly, due to years of declining business, Steve’s business partner “redistributing” restaurant, and changing tastes, Steve’s Gay 90’s Restaurant closed its doors in 1977. The building has gone through numerous changes but the shell of the sign survives.

You can see 54 images of Steve’s from the Tacoma Library’s image archive here.

Other information:

Close Cover: Seattle Restaurants, Part Two

Close Cover

This is part two in a series of Seattle restaurant matchbooks.

 1. Les Brainard’s New Grove Restaurant

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Les Brainard welcomes you to Seattle’s New Grove Restaurant, Renowned in the West for its excellent cuisine and friendly atmosphere. Charcoal broiled foods our specialty . Luncheons – Dinners – Banquet Rooms for Private Parties – Cocktails – Music – AAA Approved – dinner reservations appreciated.

Les Brainard was born and raised in Bozeman, Montana and came to Seattle during the Great Depression.  He started working in a restaurant, washing dishes and finally earned enough to purchase the restaurant in which he was working. The restaurant,now called Les Brainard’s was located at Secena Street and 2nd Avenue in Seattle. It was a fairly small place but he built it up to be something over the years.

The Grove was started in the early 1950s  at 522 Wall Street and struggled to gain a foothold. Les Brainard would eventually purchase the restaurant in 1956. Brainard would sell his eponymous restaurant shortly after to focus his energy on the Grove. Renovations were done and a new decor, complete with indoor trees and waitress dressed in kimonos, brought new life and success to the restaurant. The New Grove was born.

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Wikimedia Commons

For the next 25 years, the New Grove was a happening place to eat. Brainard sold the restaurant in 1977. It closed sometime after that. Les Brainard passed away in 1990 at the age of 81.

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2. Kirkpatrick’s

Kirkpatrick’s, located at 416 Union, was an Irish themed restaurant that either before or during World War II. Featuring the full-Irish theme of leprechauns, shamrocks, harps, fairies; the restaurant served Irish-style food and drinks in The Blarney Room. You can see the menu above for their complete menu ca. 1944. I can’t tell how long the restaurant stayed in business but it doesn’t appear that it made it to the 1960s.

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3. Roland’s Market Restaurant

Now this one is an absolute doozy. I cannot find anything. There is nothing on any search engine, in any newspaper archive or anything else. The location, at 8071 S. Tacoma Way, is a strip mall so that doesn’t help. I am guessing from the design and font on this 30-strike matchbook that it was around in 1980s/early 1990s. Let me know if you know anything about Roland’s.

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4. Leo’s Fountain Cafe

“Meet Me at Leo’s” was the slogan of this small fountain cafe started by a man named Leo Cruise. Located at 45th and University Way, Leo’s appears to have been a 24-hour restaurant or at least open very late.

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5. King’s Row Restaurant and Jester’s Room

The King’s Row Restaurant Jester’s Room were located at 3935 Stoneway in Seattle. I have not be able to find much of anything about this place. Looking at the map, the building has been torn down and replaced with apartments/condos. The restaurant appears to have been open from the late 50s/early 60s until the 1980s. Again, if you have any information leave a comment.

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6. Terry’s Coffee Shop

Terry’s was located at 3401 4th Ave. South in Seattle. They advertised the best hotcake in town, I wonder if that was even remotely true. I mean, sometime’s these hole-in-the-wall type places have the best food. The proprietorswere Terry and Midlred Martinez. It’s gone now

Brunswick Cafe – Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

Cardboard America

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The Brunswick Cafe and Tepee Room with its now very much non-PC mascot named “skookum-um-chuck” was located at 411 Sherman St. in downtown Coeur d’Alene, Idaho. Advertisements encouraged people to look for the “SIGN OF THE INDIAN.”

According to the back of the postcard above:

THE BRUNSWICK CAFE & TEPEE ROOM, located right downtown in Idaho’s foremost tourist mecca, Coeur d’Alene. It has a unique front featuring skookum-um-chuck, the smiling Indian. Fine food is hot-served. The cozy interior also makes it the place where everybody goes for “just a cup of coffee,” full course dinner, sizzling steak or their famous specialty – the “awful-awful.”

Bill Webster opened the Brunswick Cafe in January, 1954 but he had bigger ambitions than just running a restaurant. Webster served as a Democrat in the Idaho House from 1956-1961. In 1965 he was elected to the Senate where he served two terms before dropping out.In 1968, he was elected again and served until 1970.

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In 1971, he became the superintendent of the Idaho State Liquor Dispensary. Too busy to deal with his new appointment and pressure of running the now dated restaurant, Webster sold his location Tom Robb to further expand his Iron Horse Restaurant.

The “Awful-Awful” is an incredibly large and messy hamburger and is still being served at the Iron Horse.

Close Cover: Seattle Restaurants, Part One

Close Cover

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1. Ivar’s Acres of Clams & The Captain’s Table

Ivar’s Acres of Clams is a Seattle institution. The restaurant, opened by Seattle folk-singer Ivar Hagland, originally opened in 1938, but this incarnation, at the same location, opened in 1946. There are numerous location, but only a few actual restaurants. You can check out their website for all of the locations.

The Captain’s Table opened in 1964 at 333 Elliott Ave. W. At one time The Captain’s Table was the gauche spot to have a classy seafood meal in Seattle. But in the 1970s business slowed a bit and the restaurant was changed to a more family-friendly vibe. In 1991, faced with the cost of significant structural repairs to the building, which they did not own, The Captain’s Table was relocated to the town of Mukilteo and renamed Ivar’s Mukilteo Landing. It is still open to this day.

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2. Hofbrau

Hofbrau, a German restaurant was located at 5th & Lenora, directly under the monorail track, in downtown Seattle. The restaurant offered a “Tyrolean” Atmosphere & lively Bavarian band. It touted itself as the restaurant “where fun and fine food clap hands.” It appeared to be around in the ’50s and ’60s. I have found very little information about this place. I cannot even figure out which corner housed the restaurant.

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3. King Oscar’s Smorgasbord

King Oscar’s was located at 4300 Aurora Ave N. Known for their Swedish-style Smorgasbord and Swedish pancakes.The Swedish pancakes were served king’s style, filled with a rich cream sauce, chicken, and mushrooms, all served from a chafing dish at the table. The Fjord Room, located upstairs, featured entertainment in a room with Scandinavian decor. The Fjord Room featured  a cocktail “The Voyager” which was served in a bowl like drinking glass for two people. Inside the bowl, floating in the drink, were a couple of little Viking ships. The restaurant opened in the mid-1950s and closed sometime in the late 1970s.

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4. Copper Kitchen Restaurant

The Copper Kitchen was located at 1641 Westlake. Started by Scotty Watts, owner of the Peppermill and the Dutch Oven restaurants in Seattle, The Copper Kitchen specialized in home-style food at a reasonable price. This type of restaurant seemed to exist in every town in the United States in the 60s and 70s. Close your eyes and you can picture the decor and smell the stale cigarette smoke and soup lingering in the air. You see the waitresses decked out in gold or avocado green. I can’t find much information about when it opened and closed. The Westlake Center is now located at the site of the restaurant.

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5. Hattie’s Hat Restaurant and Aunt Harriet’s Room

Hattie’s Hat, a Ballard/Seattle institution, originally opened in 1904 and it still going in 2016. The restaurant contains a wide variety of food, including veggie and vegan friendly options. The drinks are strong and the food is good. I am guess this matchbook dates to the 1960s before the all-numeric seven digit phone numbers were instituted.

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6. Gino’s American Italian Restaurant

Gino’s was located at 620 Union St. in Seattle. This one is tough. There are and have been several Italian restaurants and bistros with Gino’s in the name. I cannot tell if they’re affiliated with this place or if it is just a common Italian name. This matchbook dates to probably the early to mid 1950s.

If you have any information on this place, please leave me a comment or send me an e-mail. My address is the site name at gmail.com. All one word.