Dear Little Florence

Cardboard America, Cardboard Greetings

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Mailed from Columbus, Nebraska to Calmar, Iowa on December 31, 1907:

Dear Little Florence,
I wish you a very Happy New Year. I like Columbus real well. I have two rack chickens. I hope to have more some day. Santa Claus was very good to Paul and me. We have no snow and the dust is terrible, I am in the 4th grade I like my teacher her name is Mrs. Watts – from Paul & Lester

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My Ears Are Buzzing

Cardboard Greetings, Uncategorized

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Mailed from Minneapolis, Minnesota to Miss Florence Fitzgerald of Edinboro, Pennsylvania on July 27, 1907:

Arrived here at eleven o’clock last night. Will spend a few days here. Had a fine journey and were not as tired as we expected. Are spending the morning writing and this afternoon are going out with some friends we met on the train. Ha, ha, my ears are buzzing from the noise on the streets. Imagine you hear it.

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The Burning of the Iroquois Hotel – Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan

Cardboard America, Cardboard Greetings, City in Ruins

CITY IN RUINS

WHAT: Hotel Fire
WHEN: March 12, 1907
WHERE: Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan
CASUALTIES: Zero. The hotel was totally destroyed

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While not a fire that resulted in any loss of life, the Iroquois Hotel fire of 1907 is fascinating to me. The postcard above was mailed the very same day that the hotel burned to the ground.

This 1905 Detroit Publishing Company postcard was one of the catalysts for starting the City in Ruins project. The message is simple but gives the date and mentions the fact that the hotel burned that morning.

The postcard was mailed from Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan  to Miss Nina Jenks, Chicago, Illinois on March 12, 1907:

Dear Nina,
This hotel burnt to the ground this morning.
Corrine Armstrong

As mentioned in the article posted, this was the second fire at that exact site. Nine years earlier a hotel at that site was destroyed and G.D. Welton, the manager, narrowly escaped with his life.

The new hotel, dubbed the Iroquois was erected at a cost of $60,000 with $40,000 in furnishings.

The fire in the Iroquois started in a sample room; caused by a coal explosion in a fireplace. The flames burned for five hours and destroyed a residence next door.

All twenty-five guests escaped the building quickly, leaving all their possessions behind. Luckily, it was the off-season and the hotel was not full or the damage and danger would have increased exponentially.

The firemen putting out the blaze were unable to fight the flames as both the water main and the hydrants were frozen solid. They had to basically wait for the fire to die down in its own and spray it with what little water they had available.

There were no injuries or casualties but the loss was total. I don’t believe another hotel was built on that site.

 

 

 

 

I was able to find a 1907 insurance claim after the conflagration. These were the final results.

 

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